Make your New Year’s Resolutions “RE-SOLUTIONS” instead!

December 20th, 2013 | By Marjie No Comments

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We’ve all done it … made New Year’s resolutions to clean out the closets (once and for all!), or to read more books (and watch fewer TV shows), or to lose weight. That last one is classic, and it’s probably the most popular resolution of all.

As we ring in 2014, though, how about we all focus on the ‘solutions’ that will help us live a healthier and happier life. This year, instead of vowing to lose a certain amount of weight, or a certain number of inches, we focus, instead, on striving to be healthy and fit. This is what we’re calling New Year’s Re-SOLUTIONS!

Look around you. Every body type and shape imaginable is within easy sight. There is no “perfect body” or “normal figure.” What if we all look at our health instead of our appearance. And instead of losing weight to get healthy, we just get healthy. In the process, it is possible – probable, even – that we will lose weight at the same time.

Here is an excerpt from a correspondence we received from the folks at WOW Bootcamp. We couldn’t have said it better!

If your goal is fat loss, you have two paths to choose from:

(1) lose weight and hope to be healthier, or  (2) become healthier and naturally lose weight.

90% of Americans choose the former — it’s the same concept gyms and doctors sell to us. And what do we have to show for it? We’re number one in preventable disease, we have an obesity epidemic, and we’re trending in the wrong direction.

That’s because the paradigm is backwards.

We aren’t sick because we’re overweight, we’re overweight because we’re sick. Obesity is the symptom, not the cause.

When we commit to living healthier, weight loss presents as a side effect. A healthy human body does not carry a bunch of extra weight for no reason.

Whether you’re a child, a teen, an adult, or a senior, the decision to become healthy and fit must start in your heart and your head before your efforts will be successful. So …

  1. Re-think your situation. What are you willing and able to do to make a difference in your eating and exercise routines? Do you need a partner or coach to provide encouragement during your workouts? Do you need help learning how to prepare healthier meals? What motivates you?
  2. Once you have the answers/solutions to the questions above, you’re ready to get started. You’re ready to tackle your RE-SOLUTIONS!

Changing your eating habits can quickly make a noticeable difference in the way you feel. The folks at WOW Bootcamp use this to-do list to stay motivated and hold themselves accountable:

  • Write a grocery list or, better yet, create a menu. This helps you keep track of what you’re eating, plus you’ll spend less for food because you’ll be planning better (which means less waste).
  • Go to the grocery to be sure there are healthy food options available at all times. (If you are less likely to eat fresh veggies and fruits if you have to take the time to prepare them, try to budget a little extra for pre-peeled and cut products.)
  • Decide not to eat out more than once a week … and then stick to that decision. And, when dining out, make healthy choices.
  • On the nights you prepare dinner for yourself, cook something healthy whether you feel like it or not.
  • Show up for your scheduled workouts whether you feel like it or not.

Last January, a friend of mine said to me, “I’ve been dieting and exercising for an entire year, and I have lost exactly three pounds and zero inches. Apparently, I am just going to look like this the rest of my life.” My response to her was this: “Why are you dieting and exercising? Is it to lose weight and inches or is it to be fit and healthy?” (Gee, sounds like an article for Athens MOVE!) She said that it was “for both.” But after some more conversation, here’s what I learned … First, she had not changed her workout for a year. She was using the treadmill for the same amount of time and at the same intensity at the end of the year as when she started. She monitored her calorie intake, but she didn’t monitor the foods she chose to eat. In other words, she might have eaten 300 calories for lunch, but they may have been in the form of three cookies instead of a pile of veggies and a hard-boiled egg.

Can you see what was wrong with this picture? My friend wasn’t nurturing her body. She was nurturing the idea of eating healthfully and exercising, but she was not really following through. As a result, she experienced no significant change.

A couple of months ago, I ran into that same friend. She had clearly dropped several clothes sizes and, more important, she was energetic, happy, and healthy! This time, she told me that she had no idea what she weighed or how many inches she lost. She simply knew she felt and looked better, and was thrilled with both. It turns out that she started working with a personal trainer and a nutritionist. They helped her set goals based on her own optimum BMI (body mass index), cholesterol and blood pressure levels, and her desire to have more energy as the mom of two teenagers. What a difference it made for her to strive to be healthy! In the end, she achieved that goal and she lost weight and inches.

So this year, as you think about your own New Year’s resolutions, we at Athens MOVE would like to challenge you to think about reSOLUTIONS instead. Re-think your motivation for exercise and nutrition, and then find solutions that will help you reach your goals.

Please let us know at info@athensmove.com or post a note on Facebook to let us know what you plan to do in 2014 to propel you into a healthier lifestyle. Happy New Year!

 

 

Life Zone

As you plan and begin your new year’s resolutions, focus more on the ‘solutions’ that will help you live a healthier and happier life.  Don’t focus just on losing a certain amount of weight; instead, focus on being healthy and fit.  By taking some simple steps, you will see results just like Taz Qadri (page 48).

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